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  • Oct 19, 2020

Masks - More than a Fashion Statement

Wearing a mask is more than a fashion statement.

Wearing a mask is more than a fashion statement. It’s one of the best ways to protect yourself and others from COVID-19. Have you ever wondered how to properly wear your mask and how to keep it clean?

The CDC recommends wearing a mask in all public settings, especially when you can’t stay six feet apart, and many states now require them. Masks should be washed regularly. You can wash them in your regular laundry using normal detergent on the warmest setting possible. Dry them in your dryer on the highest temperature setting and remove them when completely dry.

Try not to touch your mask once it’s put on and wash your hands if you do.

Masks need to be removed carefully by:

  • Untying the strings or stretching the ear loops.
  • Only touching the ear loops or ties.
  • Once removed, fold the outside corners together.
  • Place cloth masks in the washing machine or dispose of paper ones.
  • Be careful not to touch your eyes, nose or mouth and wash your hands right away after mask removal.

Try to get a snug fit and wear masks properly.

  • Masks need to cover your nose and mouth. They should be two or more layers to protect yourself and others.
  • Everyone should be wearing masks except for children under two or people who have trouble breathing.
  • Avoid masks with valves as they push out air, increasing risk to those around you.
  • Avoid wearing gators and face shields because their effectiveness is unknown.
  • Help healthcare workers by not wearing N95 masks. This lets supplies go where they’re most needed.

Make a difference and wear your mask!


Disclaimer
This articles provide general information for educational purposes only. The information provided in this article, or through linkages to other sites, is not a substitute for medical or professional care, and you should not use the information in place of a visit, call consultation or the advice of your physician or other healthcare provider.

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